Wiley_George_Rayner_QJEP_FINAL_PREPUB.pdf (230.58 kB)
0/0

Baseball fans don't like lumpy batters: Influence of domain knowledge on the access of subordinate meanings.

Download (230.58 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 18.06.2018 by Jennifer Wiley, Tim George, Keith Rayner
Two experiments investigated the effects of domain knowledge on the resolution of ambiguous words with dominant meanings related to baseball. When placed in a sentence context that strongly biased toward the non-baseball meaning (positive evidence), or excluded the baseball meaning (negative evidence), baseball experts had more difficulty than non-experts resolving the ambiguity. Sentence contexts containing positive evidence supported earlier resolution than did the negative evidence condition for both experts and non-experts. These experiments extend prior findings, and can be seen as support for the reordered access model of lexical access, where both prior knowledge and discourse context influence the availability of word meanings.

Funding

This work was supported by NIH Grant HD17246 and was conducted in part while the first author was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship on NIMH Training Grant MH16745 and the third author was supported by NIMH Research Scientist Award MH01255

History

Publisher Statement

Copyright @ SAGE Publications

Citation

Wiley, J., George, T. and Rayner, K. Baseball fans don't like lumpy batters: Influence of domain knowledge on the access of subordinate meanings. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 2018. 71(1): 93-102. 10.1080/17470218.2016.1251470.

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Language

en_US

issn

1747-0218

Issue date

08/11/2016

Exports

Categories

Exports