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The Impact of the BAILAMOS™ Dance Program on Brain Functional Connectivity and Cognition in Older Latino Adults: a Pilot Study

journal contribution
posted on 06.04.2022, 16:47 by Guilherme M Balbim, Olusola AjiloreOlusola Ajilore, Kirk I Erickson, Melissa LamarMelissa Lamar, Susan Aguiñaga, Eduardo BustamanteEduardo Bustamante, David MarquezDavid Marquez
Dance is a culturally salient form of physical activity (PA) for older Latinos. Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is a putative biomarker for age-related cognitive decline. We aimed to investigate the impact of the BAILAMOS™ dance program on FC in three brain functional networks (Default Mode [DMN], Frontoparietal [FPN], and Salience [SAL] networks), and cognition. Ten cognitively healthy older Latinos participated in the four-month BAILAMOS™ dance program. We assessed PA levels (self-reported and device-assessed) and estimated cardiorespiratory fitness, cognition, and resting-state FC via functional magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and post-intervention. We performed paired t-tests and Pearson correlations. Given the pilot nature of the study, significance levels were set at p < 0.05 and effect sizes are reported. We observed a significant increase in self-reported moderate leisure-time PA from pre- to post-intervention (t(9) = 3.16, p = 0.011, d = 0.66). FC within-FPN regions of interest (ROIs) significantly increased pre- to post-intervention (t(9) = 2.35, p = 0.043, d = 0.70). DMN ROIs showed an increase, with a moderate effect size, in the integration with other networks' ROIs (t(9) = 1.96, p = 0.081, d = 0.64) post-intervention. Increases in moderate leisure-time PA at post-intervention were associated with increases in the FC within-FPN (R = 0.79, p = 0.006). Our results suggest that dance might be a promising approach for improving age-related disruption of FC within- and between-networks commonly associated with cognitive decline.

Funding

Midwest Roybal Center For Health PromotionS | Funder: National Institutes of Health (National Institute on Aging) | Grant ID: P30AG022849

History

Citation

Balbim, G. M., Ajilore, O. A., Erickson, K. I., Lamar, M., Aguiñaga, S., Bustamante, E. E.Marquez, D. X. (2020). The Impact of the BAILAMOS™ Dance Program on Brain Functional Connectivity and Cognition in Older Latino Adults: a Pilot Study. Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, 5(1), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41465-020-00185-1

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Language

en

issn

2509-3290