Creating Community Through Multi-Disciplinary, Multi-Level Faculty Development in Medical Education

2019-12-01T00:00:00Z (GMT) by Laura Mazer
Purpose: Physicians are expected to teach on the wards, but receive very little formal training in medical education. Faculty development programs are one tool to help bridge this gap. These programs may create a community of medical educators, allowing these highly trained learners to benefit from the expertise and support of the entire group. This paper provides a description and evaluation of one faculty development program, with a focus on the creation of a community of practice in medical education. Method: This paper provides an evaluation of a year-long seminar based, multi-level, multi-disciplinary faculty development program at one academic medical center from 2015-2018. Participants in the Honors Program attended seminars, mentored small group sessions, and completed a longitudinal scholarly project. The results of the program are evaluated using participation data, seminar evaluations, and overall evaluations in the form of surveys and semi-structured interviews. Results: Average participation increased from a mean of 39 attendees per seminar in 2015-16, to 83 in 2016-17 and 73 attendees in 2017-18. 12 participants completed the Honors Program in the first year, increasing to 35 in the 2nd and 29 in the 3rd year. Honors Scholars included faculty, students, staff, and residents. Overall ratings for individual seminars were high. The 76 scholars were invited to participate in a program evaluation survey, with a 41% (n=31) response rate. Respondents felt that they had an increased belonging to a community of medical educators, more people to ask for help, and greater confidence in their teaching abilities after the program (p<0.001). 15 semi-structured interviews were completed as well, and responses were coded using the elements of a community of practice, including domain, community, and practice. Conclusions: The creation of a community of practice amongst medical educators was an impactful and meaningful component of this faculty development program.