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Household Health Responses to the Introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Kenya

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thesis
posted on 31.10.2017, 00:00 by Walter Obiero Ochieng
There is little work on the complementarity effects of HIV treatment programs on health investments, despite the salience associated with mitigation of HIV-related mortality risk. Estimates of such spillover effects are vital for cost-benefit assessments of HIV programs and for resource allocation decisions. I exploit temporal and spatial variation in the rollout of HIV treatment programs using difference-in-differences and instrumental variables to assess for these effects. I find that HIV programs in Kenya were associated with an increase in birth weights of around 90 grams (40 -- 290 grams). The evidence for such effects on vaccinations is mixed, with significant effects noted across all vaccines with the exception of those under the third schedule. I find weaker evidence for complementarity effects in BCG and DPT vaccine uptake rates. These results are robust to a number of robustness checks, two-stage least squares, sample restrictions to HIV negative subpopulations and Monte Carlo simulation regressions.

History

Advisor

LoSasso, Anthony T

Chair

LoSasso, Anthony T

Department

Public Health Sciences-Health Policy Administration

Degree Grantor

University of Illinois at Chicago

Degree Level

Doctoral

Committee Member

Bailey, Robert C Qureshi, Javaeria Lubotsky, Darren Mensah, Edward

Submitted date

August 2017

Issue date

31/07/2017