Now showing items 1-6 of 6

    • Analogical Problem Solving: A Common Explanation, but a Rare Observation 

      Cushen, Patrick J. (2012-12-10)
      Given the widespread belief that analogical processing is an important mechanism for creative problem solving, but a lack of evidence for spontaneous transfer in laboratory studies, a critical direction for future research ...
    • Overcoming Fixation: The Role for Incubation and Inhibition 

      Koppel, Rebecca H. (2012-12-10)
      Storm and Angello (2010) demonstrated that the inhibitory mechanism underlying retrieval-induced forgetting benefited performance on the Remote Associates Task (RAT; Mednick, 1962) under fixated conditions. They attributed ...
    • Putting Measurements of Retrieval-Induced Forgetting to the Test 

      Schilling, Christopher J. (2012-12-13)
      Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is a consequence of retrieval that produces forgetting of other, previously learned information. Presently, researchers disagree on whether the phenomenon is inhibitory in nature, and ...
    • Retrieval-Induced Forgetting of Emotional Autobiographical Memories 

      Jobe, Tara A. (2012-12-10)
      Retrieval-induced forgetting is a phenomenon in which the retrieval of an item from memory causes the forgetting of other related or competing items. This forgetting is thought to be the consequence of inhibitory processes ...
    • Unblocking Memory through Directed Forgetting 

      Koppel, Rebecca H.; Storm, Benjamin C. (Taylor & Francis, 2012-12)
      The ability to remember an item can be blocked, or negatively primed, by exposure to related items. For example, ALLERGY is less likely to be generated given the word fragment A_L_ _GY if one is first exposed to ANALOGY ...
    • Understanding Different Kinds of Mental Fixation 

      Koppel, Rebecca H. (2015-10-21)
      Problems can be difficult to solve because people become fixated by exposure to misleading information, or fixated by misleading prior knowledge. The two instances of fixation feel like they’re qualitatively different, ...