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dc.contributor.authorMehta, Supriya D.
dc.contributor.authorGaydos, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorMaclean, Ian
dc.contributor.authorOdoyo-June, Elijah
dc.contributor.authorMoses, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorAgunda, Lawrence
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Robert C.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-12T15:56:59Z
dc.date.available2013-12-06T22:16:08Z
dc.date.issued2012-04
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMehta SD, Gaydos C, Maclean I, Odoyo-June E, Moses S, Agunda L, Quinn N, Bailey RC. The Effect of Medical Male Circumcision on Urogenital Mycoplasma genitalium Among Men in Kisumu, Kenya. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2012;39(4):276-280. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e318240189cen_US
dc.identifier.issn1537-4521
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/10095
dc.descriptionPost print version of article may differ from published version. The final publication is available at www.lww.com/; DOI:10.1097/OLQ.0b013e318240189cen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: We determined the prevalence of urethral Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) infection and whether infection was associated with circumcision status, among men enrolled in the randomized trial of medical male circumcision to prevent HIV acquisition in Kisumu, Kenya. Methods: M. genitalium and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) were detected in first void urine (FVU) by APTIMA transcription mediated amplification assay. FVU and urethral swabs were assessed for N. gonorrhoeae (NG) and C. trachomatis (CT) by polymerase chain reaction assay. HSV-2 antibodies were detected by IgG ELISA. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with MG infection. Results: Specimens were collected between July and September 2010, and 52 [9.9%; 95% CI: 7.3-12.4%] MG infections were detected among 526 men. NG and TV were not associated with MG. CT co-infection was 5.8% in MG-infected men, and 0.8% among MG-uninfected men (p=0.02). MG infection was predominantly asymptomatic (98%). The prevalence of MG was 13.4% in uncircumcised men vs. 8.2% in circumcised men (p=0.06). Being circumcised nearly halved the odds of MG [adjusted OR=0.54; 95% CI: 0.29-0.99], adjusted for other variables significant at the p<0.05 level: HSV-2 infection [aOR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.05-4.00], CT infection [aOR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.44-5.02], and washing the penis <=1 hour after sex [aOR=0.47; 95% CI: 0.24-0.95]. Conclusions: MG infection was reduced among men who were circumcised, adding to the benefits of male circumcision in preventing several sexually transmitted infections.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grant number AI50440 from the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Disease of the United States National Institutes of Health, AI50440-S (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), and by grant number HCT 44180 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). S Moses was supported by a CIHR Investigator Award.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.subjectcircumcisionen_US
dc.subjectMycoplasma genitaliumen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectHSV-2en_US
dc.subjectChlamydia trachomatisen_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Medical Male Circumcision on Urogenital Mycoplasma genitalium among Men in Kisumu, Kenyaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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