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dc.contributor.authorNg, Shamay S. M.
dc.contributor.authorHui-Chan, Christina W. Y.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-10T19:10:54Z
dc.date.available2014-02-10T19:10:54Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNg, S. S. M. and Hui-Chan, C. W. Y.Ankle Dorsiflexion, Not Plantarflexion Strength, Predicts the Functional Modility of People with Spastic Hemiplegia. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine. 2013. 45(6): 541-545. DOI: 10.2340/16501977-1154en_US
dc.identifier.issn1650-1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/11153
dc.description© 2013 by Foundation for Rehabilitation Information, Journal of Rehabilitation Medicineen_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the relationships between affected ankle dorsiflexion strength, other ankle muscle strength measurements, plantarflexor spasticity, and Timed "Up & Go" (TUG) times in people with spastic hemiplegia after stroke. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: A university-based rehabilitation centre. Participants: Seventy-three subjects with spastic hemiplegia. Main outcome measures: Functional mobility was assessed using TUG times. Plantarflexor spasticity was measured using the Composite Spasticity Scale. Affected and unaffected ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength were recorded using a load-cell mounted on a foot support with the knee bent at 50 degrees and subjects in supine lying. Results: TUG times demonstrated strong negative correlation with affected ankle dorsiflexion strength (r=-0.67, p <= 0.001) and weak negative correlations with other ankle muscle strength measurements (r=-0.28 to -0.31, p <= 0.05), but no significant correlation with plantarflexor spasticity. A linear regression model showed that affected ankle dorsiflexion strength was independently associated with TUG times and accounted for 27.5% of the variance. The whole model explained 47.5% of the variance in TUG times. Conclusion: Affected ankle dorsiflexion strength is a crucial component in determining the TUG performance, which is thought to reflect functional mobility in subjects with spastic hemiplegia.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Health Service Research Fund (reference K-ZK34) from the Food and Health Bureau, The Hong Kong Government to Christina W.Y. Hui-Chan and her team.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFoundation for Rehabilitation Informationen_US
dc.subjectstrokeen_US
dc.subjectanklesen_US
dc.subjectwalkingen_US
dc.titleAnkle Dorsiflexion, Not Plantarflexion Strength, Predicts the Functional Modility of People with Spastic Hemiplegiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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