Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorVarady, Krista A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoddy, Kristin K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-18T21:38:16Z
dc.date.available2016-10-18T21:38:16Z
dc.date.copyrightCopyright 2016 Kristin K. Hoddy
dc.date.created2016-08en_US
dc.date.issued2016-10-18
dc.date.submitted2016-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21175
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Alternate day fasting (ADF) involves the cycling between consuming 25% energy needs on the “fast day” with ad libitum intake on the “feed day”. It is effective for weight loss when the fast day meal is eaten at lunch. However, consuming this meal at a different time may optimize ADF for a broader group of dieters. Diet tolerability may be improved if this fast day meal was eaten at dinner or distributed throughout the day as small meals. Preliminary evidence suggests that ADF is safe; however, further investigation is warranted. Appetite alterations during ADF are not well understood. Accordingly, this study aimed to determine the optimal meal time and frequency of the fast day meal, evaluate the safety of this diet, and examine the effect of ADF on postprandial appetite ratings and gut peptides Methods: Obese subjects (n = 59) participated in an 8-week ADF study. Food was provided on the fast day. Results: All groups lost a similar amount of body weight, body fat, and visceral fat (P < 0.001). Plasma lipids were unaffected, and LDL particle size increased (P < 0.05) in all groups (1.3 ± 0.5 Å). Minor adverse events included constipation (17%), water retention (2%), dizziness (<20%), and general weakness (<15%). Depression and binge eating decreased (P < 0.01) after the diet. Purgative behavior and fear of fatness did not change. Subjects reported an improvement in (P < 0.01) restrictive eating and (P < 0.01) body image perception. Fasting leptin and insulin decreased (P < 0.05) and ghrelin AUC levels increased (P < 0.05). However hunger sensations were unchanged. PYY increased (P < 0.05) as did subjective fullness. Conclusion: Therefore, several ADF protocols are effective for weight loss and cardio-protections. Collectively, ADF appears to have minimal adverse effects and results in benign or beneficial alterations to psychological outcomes. Additionally, the appetite alterations stand to promote diet adherence due to an increase in fullness sensations without compensatory increases in hunger during weight loss.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCalorie restrictionen_US
dc.subjectalternate day fastingen_US
dc.subjectsafetyen_US
dc.subjectadverse eventsen_US
dc.subjecteating disorder behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectobese adultsen_US
dc.subjecthungeren_US
dc.subjectfullnessen_US
dc.subjectgut peptidesen_US
dc.subjectmeal timingen_US
dc.subjectmeal frequencyen_US
dc.subjectcoronary heart diseaseen_US
dc.subjectinsulin resistanceen_US
dc.titleMeal Timing during Alternate Day Fasting: Effect on Body Weight and Cardiovascular Disease Risken_US
thesis.degree.departmentKinesiology and Nutritionen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineKinesiology, Nutrition, and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBhatt, Tanvien_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFoucher, Karmaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBrown, Michael D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTussing Humphreys, Lisaen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record