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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, E. C.
dc.contributor.authorMinor, E. S.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T18:30:24Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T18:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-11
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAnderson, E. C. and Minor, E. S. Vacant lots: An underexplored resource for ecological and social benefits in cities. Urban Forestry and Urban Greening. 2017. 21: 146-152. DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2016.11.015.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1618-8667
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21494
dc.descriptionNOTICE: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Urban Forestry and Urban Greening. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, [11/09/2016] DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2016.11.015en_US
dc.description.abstracttVacant lots make up a large proportion of urban land and are of interest to many stakeholder groups.While they are often viewed as dangerous or unsightly, they can be an economic, social, and ecologicalresource. Here we present a literature review focused on restoring biodiversity in vacant lots, empha-sizing the intersection of human and wildlife needs. We focus on the benefits, challenges, and processesof restoration in vacant lots and synthesize ecological, social, and economic information across thesedomains. We suggest that fast, inexpensive restoration techniques could be implemented in vacant lotsand would be well suited to increasing greenspace in low-income areas. Furthermore, we emphasize thatland managers, ecologists, sociologists, urban planners, and local communities must work together toconceptualize, carry out, and monitor restoration projects, as these projects are often characterized bydisparate goals and insufficient follow-up. Vacant lot restoration is best addressed by an interdisciplinaryapproach that combines economic, social, and environmental needs and concerns into a holistic urbanland use paradigm.en_US
dc.publisherUrban Forestry and Urban Greeningen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectInformal green spaceen_US
dc.subjectRestorationen_US
dc.subjectSocial ecologyen_US
dc.subjectUrbanen_US
dc.titleVacant lots: An underexplored resource for ecological and social benefits in cities.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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