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dc.contributor.authorRehman, Jalees
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T21:07:10Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T21:07:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-07
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationRehman, Jalees. "A Parched Future: Global Land and Water Grabbing" 3 Quarks Daily. 3 Quarks Daily, 7 Jan. 2013. Web. 19 June 2017. <http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarksdaily/2013/01/a-parched-future-global-land-and-water-grabbing.html>.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21671
dc.description.abstractLand grabbing refers to the large-scale acquisition of comparatively inexpensive agricultural land in foreign countries by foreign governments or corporations. In most cases, the acquired land is located in under-developed countries in Africa, Asia, or South America, while the grabbers are investment funds based in Europe, North America, and the Middle East. The acquisition can take the form of an outright purchase or a long-term-lease, ranging from 25 to 99 years, that gives the grabbing entity extensive control over the acquired land. Proponents of such large-scale acquisitions have criticized the term “land grabbing” because it carries the stigma of illegitimacy and conjures up images of colonialism or other forms of unethical land acquisitions that were so common in the not-so-distant past. They point out that land acquisitions by foreign investors are made in accordance with the local laws and that the investments could create jobs and development opportunities in impoverished countries. However, recent reports suggest that these land acquisitions are indeed “land grabs.” NGOs and not-for-profit organizations such as GRAIN, TNI, and Oxfam have documented the disastrous consequences of large-scale land acquisitions for the local communities. More often than not, the promised jobs are not created, and families that were farming the land for generations are evicted from their ancestral land and lose their livelihoods. The money provided to the government by the investors frequently disappears into the coffers of corrupt officials while the evicted farmers receive little or no compensation.en_US
dc.publisherwww.3Quarksdaily.comen_US
dc.subjectwater grabbingen_US
dc.subjectland grabbingen_US
dc.subjectwateren_US
dc.subjectsocial justiceen_US
dc.subjectenvironmenten_US
dc.titleA Parched Future: Global Land and Water Grabbingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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