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dc.contributor.authorKim, S.
dc.contributor.authorPark, C.
dc.contributor.authorO'Rourke, J.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-27T17:12:14Z
dc.date.available2017-07-14T09:30:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-26
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationKim, S., Park, C. and O'Rourke, J. Effectiveness of online simulation training: Measuring faculty knowledge, perceptions, and intention to adopt. Nurse Education Today. 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.12.022.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0260-6917
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/21700
dc.descriptionNOTICE: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Nurse Education Today. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Nurse Education Today, 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.12.022en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Best practice standards of simulation recommend standardized simulation training for nursing faculty. Online training may offer an effective and more widely available alternative to in-person training. Objectives: Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, this study evaluated the effectiveness of an online simulation training program, examining faculty's foundational knowledge of simulation as well as perceptions and intention to adopt. Design: One-group pretest-posttest design. Setting: A large school of nursing with a main campus and five regional campuses in the Midwestern United States. Participants: Convenience sample of 52 faculty participants. Methods: Knowledge of foundational simulation principles was measured by pre/post-training module quizzes. Perceptions and the intention to adopt simulation were measured using the Faculty Attitudes and Intent to Use Related to the Human Patient Simulator questionnaire. Results: There was a significant improvement in faculty knowledge after training and observable improvements in attitudes. Attitudes significantly influenced the intention to adopt simulation (B. =2.54, . p . <. 0.001). Conclusions: Online simulation training provides an effective alternative for training large numbers of nursing faculty who seek to implement best practice of standards within their institutions.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectAdoptionen_US
dc.subjectFaculty trainingen_US
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_US
dc.subjectOnlineen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectSimulationen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of online simulation training: Measuring faculty knowledge, perceptions, and intention to adopten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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