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dc.contributor.authorDesjardins, Claude
dc.contributor.authorBach, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorCappola, Anne R.
dc.contributor.authorSeely, Ellen W.
dc.contributor.authorEhrenberg, Ronald G.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-29T21:19:23Z
dc.date.available2012-04-29T21:19:23Z
dc.date.issued2011-02
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationDesjardins, C., Bach, M. A., Cappola, A. R., Seely, E. W., & Ehrenberg, R. G. 2011. Dissecting the Workforce and Workplace for Clinical Endocrinology, and the Work of Endocrinologists Early in Their Careers. J Clin Endocrinol.Metab. doi: 10.1210/jc.2010-1568en
dc.identifier.issn0021-972X
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.1210/jc.2010-1568
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/8284
dc.description© 2011 by Endocrine Society, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: The United States lacks timely reliable mechanisms for assessing the professional work of subspecialty physicians. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to use early-career members of The Endocrine Society as a model to estimate subspecialty physician involvement in patient care, teaching, research, and administration among clinical, academic, federal, and pharmaceutical/biotech workplaces and to assess the workforce for research within individual workplaces. METHODS: Physicians joining The Endocrine Society from 1991-2005 and residing in North America were invited to complete a Web-based survey. This report relies on 817 early-career endocrinologists or 29.6% of eligible respondents. RESULTS: Respondents from all types of workplaces engaged in patient care, teaching, research, and administration. The time committed to the four tasks, however, differed significantly among workplaces. Research (basic, translational, disease, patient, population, and prevention) was accomplished within all workplaces, but the scope and scale of investigative work was employer dependent. Recipients of National Institutes of Health K08/23 awards succeeded in receiving federal research project grants (P < 0.001). Respondents associated research with lowered incomes, a perception validated by an estimated drop in annual earnings of 2.8% per half-day spent on research (P < 0.001). Women in academic settings earned less than men (P < 0.01) and were less likely to occupy tenure-eligible positions (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Web-based surveys offer a simple tool for estimating the work of subspecialty physicians and provide a framework for improving biomedical investigation. Several interventions should be considered for endocrinology: recruit physicians from underrepresented demographic groups, increase K08/23 awards, incentivize investigative careers, and improve the national infrastructure for biomedical research.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEndocrine Societyen
dc.titleDissecting the Workforce and Workplace for Clinical Endocrinology, and the Work of Endocrinologists Early in Their Careersen
dc.typeArticleen


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