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dc.contributor.advisorKrysan, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Mosi A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-14T16:23:03Z
dc.date.available2012-12-14T16:23:03Z
dc.date.created2011-08en_US
dc.date.issued2012-12-14
dc.date.submitted2011-08en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10027/9626
dc.description.abstractSocial science research has consistently documented that Afro Caribbeans outperform African Americans in terms of labor market outcomes and socioeconomic status. Explanations for these disparities have typically focused on the human capital and cultural differences between the two groups. Unfortunately, these explanations do not consider how racial dynamics might shape these disparities. Thus, the primary goal of this dissertation is to systematically investigate the roles of human capital, culture and racial dynamics in influencing socioeconomic disparities between African Americans and Afro Caribbeans in the United States. In order to do this, I draw upon data from the National Survey of American Life, which includes a representative sample of whites (N=1,006), African Americans (N=3,570) and the first national oversample of Afro Caribbeans (N=1,623). First, I assess the role of immigrant selectivity. Next, I examine the degree to which black ethnic disparities are a result of Afro Caribbeans having higher levels of model minority cultural attitudes and behaviors than African Americans. Finally, I explore the role of US race relations. I find that attributes associated with immigrant selectivity and attitudes and behaviors associated with being a model minority explain as much as 20 percent of the black ethnic disparities. Unexpectedly, controlling for these factors often results in an increase in black ethnic disparities. Finally, I find that as much as 54 percent of the disparity is due to the labor market rewarding these two groups differently for having the same levels of the attributes under study. I offer, the differential racialization thesis as a possible motive or explanation for this differential treatment. Specifically I argue that despite having the same racial phenotype, African Americans and Afro Caribbeans are racialized differently in the US. Accordingly, employers are less critical and more accepting of Afro Caribbeans than they are of African Americans. I conclude with a discussion of the implications of these findings for our understanding of race, ethnicity and social mobility.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2011 Mosi A. Morrisonen_US
dc.subjectRaceen_US
dc.subjectethnicityen_US
dc.subjectimmigrationen_US
dc.subjectmigrationen_US
dc.subjectlabor marketen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic statusen_US
dc.subjectsocial mobilityen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic attainmenten_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic disparitiesen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic inequalityen_US
dc.titleAre Black Immigrants A Model Minority: Race, Ethnicity and Social Mobility in the United Statesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Illinois at Chicagoen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePhD, Doctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberForman, Tyroneen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCollins, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBielby, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberButterfield, Sherri-Annen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDarity, Williamen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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